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Modelling Impacts on Fishery

Committed To Securing Livelihoods

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Quantifying The Impacts of Climate Change & Other Catastrophes On The Fishing Industry

Between 2004 and 2005, 665 natural disasters incurred with an estimated death toll of 336.500 lives lost and more than 300 million people being adversely impacted. Besides the Asian tsunami in December 2004 and the earthquake in Pakistan in October 2005, floods were the main cause of the disasters. The total costs of natural disasters in 2005, including the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, have been estimated at over US$150 billion.

A disaster as severe soil erosion in a river catchment area, caused by deforestation or land degradation, may generate heavy soil sedimentation and result in flooding, storm surge or tsunami. The tsunami of 26 December 2004 is a prime example of how a geophysical disaster can severely impact coastal communities on several continents. Fishery and aquaculture in coastal communities, as well as livelihoods, were adversely impacted, notably in South East Asia. Over 200.000 lives were lost, although this is just a rough estimate. Millions of people in the region were economically debilitated, losing their livelihood, assets and sources of income. Apart from natural disasters there are also military conflicts, demand on water resources 

and biological hazards such as disease outbreaks affecting in fish, shrimp, oysters, lobsters, crabs and shellfish farms. They are a variety of other diseases and toxins, as well as low oxygen conditions, that can cause losses in freshwater and marine cage finfish culture. 

It is a full-blown conclusion that fishing industry is particularly vulnerable to hydrometeorological disasters, such as hurricanes and floods, because of relatively high exposure of the fishing industry, which takes place in coastal areas.

So clearly, disaster response cannot be limited to saving human lives alone. It must also protect and reinforce the livelihoods of the affected populations. Catastrophe risk management should also be expanded to protecting fisheries, fish farming and aquaculture, livelihoods, productive assets and tools. Lowering the vulnerability of the fishing industry increases its resilience by significantly reducing the impact of disasters on the coastal communities, which helps to accelerate rehabilitation and recovery time.

Fishery Catastrophe Models

Modelled Regions :

Click a region to see countries or islands where courage is available. 

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North America

Europe

Middle East

Central America & Caribbean

Asia & Pacific

Latin America

Africa

Australia

North America

Canada

United States

Mexico

Central America

Belize

Costa Rica

El Salvador

Honduras

Nicaragua

Panama

Caribbean

The Greater Antilles

Cuba

Puerto Rico

Jamaica

Cayman Islands

Hispaniola:

Haiti

Dominican Republic

Lucayan Archipelago

Bahamas

Turks and Caicos Islands

Lesser Antilles (Leeward Islands)

Anguilla (UK)

Saint Martin (Fr.)

Sint Maarten (Neth.)

Saint-Barthélemy (Fr.)

Saba (Neth.)

Sint Eustatius (Neth.)

Saint Kitts

Nevis

Antigua

Barbuda

Redonda

Bermuda

Montserrat (UK)

Guadeloupe (Fr.)

La Désirade (Fr.)

Marie-Galante (Fr.)

Les Saintes archipelago (Fr.)

St. Thomas (US VI)

St. John (US VI)

St. Croix (US VI)

Water Island (US VI)

Tortola (UK VI)

Virgin Gorda (UK VI)

Anegada (UK VI)

Jost Van Dyke (UK VI)

Aruba (Neth.)

Curaçao (Neth.)

Bonaire (Neth.)

La Orchila

La Tortuga

La Blanquilla

Margarita Island

Coche

Cubagua

Los Roques Archipelago

Lesser Antilles (Windward Islands)

Dominica

Martinique (Fr.)

Saint Lucia

Barbados

Saint Vincent

Grenadines

Carriacou

Petite Martinique

Grenada

Trinidad

Tobago

South America

Argentina

Bolivia

Chile

Cayman Islands

Colombia

Ecuador

Guyana

Guiana (Fr.)

Paraguay

Peru

Suriname

Uruguay

Venezuela

Europe

Andorra

Austria

Belgium

Bulgaria

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Finland

France

Germany

Greece

Hungary

Iceland

Ireland

Italy

Latvia

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Malta

Monaco

Netherlands 

Norway

Poland

Russia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

United Kingdom

Vatican City

Asia & Pacific

East Asia

China

Hong Kong (China)

Macau (China)

Japan

North Korea

South Korea

Taiwan

South Asia

Bangladesh

India

Maldives

Sri Lanka

South Asia

Brunei

Cambodia

Indonesia

Laos

Malaysia

Myanmar

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

Timor-Leste

Vietnam

Australasia

Australia

New Zealand

Melanesia

Fiji

New Caledonia (Fr)

Papua New Guinea

Solomon Islands

Vanuatu

Micronesia

Guam (US)

Kiribati

Marshall Islands

Nauru

Northern Mariana Islands (US)

Wake Island (US)

Polynesia

American Samoa (US)

Cook Islands (NZ)

Easter Island (Ch)

French Polynesia (Fr)

Niue (NZ)

Norfolk Island (A)

Tonga

Tuvalu

Samoa

Wallis and Futuna (Fr)

Modelling Vulnerability, Exposure & Risk To Fishery

Accurate Data Driven Models

Fishery, fish farming and aquaculture contributes substantially to the global economy, human food security, employment, aquaculture production, etc. Natural and human-induced disasters can cause significant economic losses and impacts on the livelihoods of fish farmers. Losses in the fishing industry and fisheries associated activities can range from wealthy investors in capital-intensive production and processing companies to artisanal  activities, who are not recorded in official statistics. In many developing countries, the fisheries sector often provides a kind of safety net for many low-income households when access to capital is limited. However, the economic repercussion of non-epidemic or epidemic disasters should not be disregarded. Natural and human-induced disasters such as, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, cyclones, marine and industrial pollution, oil and chemical spills, environmental degradation, rising ocean temperatures as a result of global warming and climate change, etc. can all lead to epidemic disasters in the fishing industry with severe economic repercussions.

Quantifying Fishing Industry Losses

At Infinite Observations we can identify and assist in the quantification of cost-benefit analysis of interventions through our assessment, analytical, visualization, management and operational tools and help policy- and decision-makers mitigate the economic impact regarding fisheries, fish farming and aquaculture sectors. We can help develop risk control practices and alternative approaches. For example, estimating damages cause by localized, small-scale extensive disasters (low intensity and high frequency) that can be economically debilitating can be challenging as opposed to high-intensity and low-recurrence (intensive risk) disasters. The economic losses in the fishing industry can be determined implicitly or explicitly when reporting (direct or indirect) losses related to contents, inventory, business disruption. Spatial and temporal factors are crucial to mitigate losses resulting in fisheries, fish farming, and aquaculture sectors. Other factors, such as seasonality, uncertainty, regulation, and practices, should also be considered.     

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ZineQx - Infinite Observations

Capture The Effects Of Catastrophes On The Fishing Industry Using Our Solutions