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Modelling Hurricane & Typhoon

Committed To Securing Livelihoods

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Modelling Hurricane Risk

Tropical cyclones, which are also known regionally as hurricane, cyclones or typhoons contribute significantly to the global annual natural disaster losses. Infinite Observations ZineQx platform specialises in modelling risk arising from hurricane catastrophes on a global scale. Risk assessment covering an entire range of landfalling, near landfalling or bypassing, and transitioning storms are taken into consideration.

Infinite Observations ZineQx Hur Cat Models (hurricane catastrophic models) are informed on large data sets of stochastic events and impact rates in distinct geographic regions.

Infinite Observations ZineQx Hur Cat Models includes features such as wind, storm surge, flooding, etc., that simulates various realistic hurricane disaster situations in any effected region.

Buildings and other civil structure specific characteristics, such as first floor elevation, roof envelop, etc. as well as national building codes, standards and regulations are also incorporate the modelling, apart from the hurricane, storm surge and water, to differentiate catastrophe scenario’s across and within regions, sub-perils and adaptation, mitigation efforts could be implemented to become more resilient in the future.

Hurricane Catastrophe Model

Modelled Regions :

Click a region to see countries or islands where coverage is available. 

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North America

Europe

Middle East

Central America & Caribbean

Asia & Pacific

Latin America

Africa

Australia

North America

Canada

United States

Mexico

Central America

Belize

Costa Rica

El Salvador

Honduras

Nicaragua

Panama

Caribbean

The Greater Antilles

Cuba

Puerto Rico

Jamaica

Cayman Islands

Hispaniola:

Haiti

Dominican Republic

Lucayan Archipelago

Bahamas

Turks and Caicos Islands

Lesser Antilles (Leeward Islands)

Anguilla (UK)

Saint Martin (Fr.)

Sint Maarten (Neth.)

Saint-Barthélemy (Fr.)

Saba (Neth.)

Sint Eustatius (Neth.)

Saint Kitts

Nevis

Antigua

Barbuda

Redonda

Bermuda

Montserrat (UK)

Guadeloupe (Fr.)

La Désirade (Fr.)

Marie-Galante (Fr.)

Les Saintes archipelago (Fr.)

St. Thomas (US VI)

St. John (US VI)

St. Croix (US VI)

Water Island (US VI)

Tortola (UK VI)

Virgin Gorda (UK VI)

Anegada (UK VI)

Jost Van Dyke (UK VI)

Aruba (Neth.)

Curaçao (Neth.)

Bonaire (Neth.)

La Orchila

La Tortuga

La Blanquilla

Margarita Island

Coche

Cubagua

Los Roques Archipelago

Lesser Antilles (Windward Islands)

Dominica

Martinique (Fr.)

Saint Lucia

Barbados

Saint Vincent

Grenadines

Carriacou

Petite Martinique

Grenada

Trinidad

Tobago

South America

Argentina

Bolivia

Chile

Cayman Islands

Colombia

Ecuador

Guyana

Guiana (Fr.)

Paraguay

Peru

Suriname

Uruguay

Venezuela

Europe

Andorra

Austria

Belgium

Bulgaria

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

Finland

France

Germany

Greece

Hungary

Iceland

Ireland

Italy

Latvia

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Malta

Monaco

Netherlands 

Norway

Poland

Russia

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Turkey

United Kingdom

Vatican City

Asia & Pacific

East Asia

China

Hong Kong (China)

Macau (China)

Japan

North Korea

South Korea

Taiwan

South Asia

Bangladesh

India

Maldives

Sri Lanka

South Asia

Brunei

Cambodia

Indonesia

Laos

Malaysia

Myanmar

Philippines

Singapore

Thailand

Timor-Leste

Vietnam

Australasia

Australia

New Zealand

Melanesia

Fiji

New Caledonia (Fr)

Papua New Guinea

Solomon Islands

Vanuatu

Micronesia

Guam (US)

Kiribati

Marshall Islands

Nauru

Northern Mariana Islands (US)

Wake Island (US)

Polynesia

American Samoa (US)

Cook Islands (NZ)

Easter Island (Ch)

French Polynesia (Fr)

Niue (NZ)

Norfolk Island (A)

Tonga

Tuvalu

Samoa

Wallis and Futuna (Fr)

Decision & Policy Making With Hurricane Risk Modelling

Data Driven Hurricane Modelling

Infinite Observations leverages advances in technology, specifically around computational efficiency and artificial intelligence, to make greater applications of data driven catastrophe models and the quantification of risk and value transfer. Our hurricane catastrophe models take current and historical factors into account such as: (1) The established approach and point of departure of long-term historical storm data as well as with a greater percentage of historical storms reaching hurricane strength. (2) Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) that are the result of accumulated atmospheric anthropogenic, which can also be influenced by episodic events, such as volcanic activity and can be coupled to precipitation anomalies, large scale droughts and floods through global teleconnections.  (3) El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which is a naturally occurring irregular climate anomaly with a periodicity that span several decades, in the central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and respectfully in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Accurate Data Driven Models

Robust modelling with our hurricane catastrophe model, which is a collection of acute physical risk scenarios (or a stochastic catalogue) gives us insights for more extensive catastrophe risk assessment, management and the power to accurately quantify risk, make informed decisions, and achieve an improved combined loss estimate. The model includes hurricane wind, storm surge, and precipitation-driven (or pluvial) and river (or fluvial) floods inland flooding. The catastrophe events correlate globally with sea surface temperature (SST) and anthropogenic emissions as the main driver. Precipitation models are used to drive a high resolution stochastic modelled land surface and river flood maps, which are in turn used as input to our probabilistic loss model. In addition, Infinite Observations catastrophe model include a financial engine, which converts physical property damage into loss estimates. This element is crucial when correlating the loss magnitude to a certain probability, which is an important factor for indemnity-based risk transfer. In the aftermath of major catastrophe, costs of material and labour usually increases as a function of availability and demand. This element is also included in our catastrophe model as part of the loss estimates.

Associated Products

Infinite Observations offers a broad spectrum of climate change related solutions and insights from the identification of climate risk to the quantification and validation of associated losses as well as analytics.

Agriculture

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Building

Large commercial construction projects, civil structures (bridges, levees and tunnels) as well as private homes are exposed natural and man-made disasters. Estimate the losses …

Environment

Environmental risks are not only related to exposure from natural catastrophes but are also associated with human behaviour. Thousands of businesses worldwide ranging in size from …

Fishery

Between 2004 and 2005, respectively 305 and 360 natural disasters incurred with an estimated death toll of 336.500 lives lost and more than 300 million people being adversely impacted …

Flood

Flood damage accounts for an increasing amount of catastrophe losses as a result of our changing climate. As more and more of the global population and wealth are …

Human, Life & Health

Life, health and longevity face many uncertainties in our ever-changing world. The global increase of infectious diseases and the resulting pandemics, the global threat of terrorism …

ZineQx - Infinite Observations

Hurricane Solutions That Help Clients Meet Their Sustainability Obligations